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DHPSNY Staff

This summer, put your organization on a fast track to reaching program goals and becoming even better stewards of the collections in your care by participating in DHPSNY services! With a month to go before our next deadline, it's the perfect time to start an application.

Our virtual Planning & Assessment Services can help your organization:

DHPSNY Staff

 

Digitizing photographic collections can improve access and minimize handling of fragile materials, but certain collections materials such as photo albums and scrapbooks can present unique challenges. In our most recent webinar, Maggie Downing discussed methods and processes for digitization of these unique photographic materials that ensure accessible digital content while also keeping in mind proper handling and care of the original materials

DHPSNY Staff

We're thrilled to announce our spring 2022 Planning & Assessment class! We look forward to beginning virtual site visits for the following institutions in the coming weeks.

Application materials for DHPSNY Planning & Assessment Services are accepted year-round and reviewed three times a year. The next application review deadline is Friday, July 15, 2022. Visit our Planning & Assessment page to learn more and apply.

DHPSNY Staff

In celebration of Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) Heritage Month we are pleased to feature projects that focus on recording the history of Asian Americans in New York State and nationwide.

DHPSNY Staff

Founded in 2010, Queens Memory is a community archiving program supported by Queens Public Library and Queens College, CUNY that focuses on building their current archives by collecting oral histories from Queens residents. In a recent DHPSNY webinar, Natalie Milbrodt, Director of Queens Memory, told the story of establishing the program with a diverse set of stakeholders and challenges the team has faced that might be helpful to others in the process of growing their own oral history programs.

Click here to view the recording.

DHPSNY Staff

Applications are open for our Planning & Assessment Services, and the next submission deadline is Friday, July 15, 2022. Conducted virtually, DHPSNY services are tailored to your organization’s unique circumstances. Each service aims to improve adherence to preservation best practices and can be utilized to obtain additional funding, increase the accessibility and use of your collections, and more.

DHPSNY Staff

Join us on Thursday, May 12 from Noon to 1:30 PM, for our second DHPSNY Dialogue: Antiracism and Engagement. Co-facilitators Aria Camaione-Lind, Ashley Gantt, and Amanda Smith will invite participants into a conversation about engaging stakeholders in your organization's antiracism efforts. They'll pay particular attention to engaging boards in the work, as well as reaching out to youth and younger stakeholders to build a cross-generational pipeline for engagement in antiracism efforts.

DHPSNY Staff

How accessible is your institution’s website? Removing barriers to people with physical and situational limitations can help make your institutional website open to a large variety of users, researchers, and potential visitors. In our most recent live webinar recording, presenter Laura Montgomery, Digital Strategies Archivist at the New York State Archives guided participants through analyzing their institution’s website for accessibility and taking concrete steps to become more accessible. 

Click here to view the recording.

DHPSNY Staff

Preservation Week, April 24 – 30, 2022, promotes the role of cultural institutions in preserving personal and public collections and treasures. This year, the theme of Preservation Week is “Preservation in the Face of Climate Change,” which highlights the effects climate change has on our shared cultural heritage and celebrates the concept of climate resiliency.

DHPSNY Staff

Join us on Tuesday, June 14 - Friday, July 15 for our next online course: Essential Policies & Procedures for Collecting Organizations.  An institution’s collections care practices are defined by its written policies and procedures. Institutional memory is often lost through staff changes, but best practices are encoded in these important documents.  

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