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DHPSNY Staff

For the past few months, we've shared and summarized specific resources that relate to antiracism work across all aspects of archives, museums, and libraries. In today's post, we hope to broaden the scope and showcase some of the wider organizations that have compiled excellent resources and are working to expand the conversation. These encompass everything from structured syllabi to crowd-sourced lists. Professional organizations and local professional networks are also great resources to turn to when seeking additional information.

DHPSNY Staff

DHPSNY is happy to share the Fall 2020 issue of DHPSNY News, our annual publication, chronicling the DHPSNY team's adventures delivering free programs and services in the Empire State. Take a look at our recap of the past year, including our Planning & Assessment Services, education programs, and more!

DHPSNY Staff

Last week, we departed from our usual webinar format to hear firsthand how staff from the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) Library battled a tenacious mold outbreak in their collections. Recounting challenges posed by building infrastructure, unforeseen staff shortages, inclement weather, and later, the COVID-19 pandemic, RPI’s Tammy Gobert, Preservation and Access Archivist, and Jenifer Monger, Assistant Institute Archivist, recounted their experiences with humor and humility, sharing insights and lessons learned along the way.

DHPSNY Staff

Recently, the Antiracism Resources series discussed resources for building a diverse workforce. In tandem with those goals is the need to create workplaces that actively support diversity and inclusion. 

DHPSNY Staff

In last week’s webinar Conducting a Basic Inventory, DHPSNY Archives Specialist Kate Philipson discussed the process and principles for carrying out a basic inventory for archival, library, or museum collections.

DHPSNY Staff

The recent deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and others have sparked protests that are among the most sustained social justice movements in American history. Many collecting institutions are interested in documenting these demands for racial equity and justice and their impact on our country, state, and local communities. However, undertaking projects to document these and other social justice movements is not simply a matter of collection development.

DHPSNY Staff

In our most recent live webinar Photographs in the Archive: Arranging and Describing Visual Materials, DHPSNY Preservation Specialist Amanda Murray discussed important considerations for successfully arranging and describing visual materials with the goals of gaining physical and intellectual control, as well as providing access points. She also touched on preservation considerations for visual materials and, at the end of the presentation, answered a stream of thoughtful questions from the audience.

DHPSNY Staff

Join us tomorrow, Thursday, October 1, at 12:00 PM for Photographs in the Archive: Arranging and Describing Visual Materials, presented by DHPSNY Preservation Specialist Amanda Murray. Learn more and register below! 

As always, DHPSNY webinars are presented free of charge for New York institutions. Visit dhpsny.org/webinars for our full schedule of upcoming presentations and archive of past webinar recordings.

WEBINAR

DHPSNY Staff

In 2006, the First Archivist Circle, working with representatives from Native American, First Nations, and Aboriginal communities, developed the Protocols for Native American Archival Material. The Protocols put forth best professional practices for culturally responsive care and use of Native American archival material, particularly those that are housed in non-tribal organizations.

DHPSNY Staff

In the fourth presentation of our “Common Collection Conditions” series, Assessing the Condition of Your Photograph Collections, presenter Barbara Lemmen, Senior Photograph Conservator at the Conservation Center for Art & Historic Artifacts, discussed how to identify common condition problems found in photograph collections and how to prioritize collection items based on the urgency of conservation needs. Additionally, she discussed methods for caring for collections until the next steps can be taken and answered an array of thoughtful questions from the audience. 

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